Getting To The Bottom Of It: Bowel Management and the Physiology of Defaecation

Biography:

Dr Torey Lawrence is a full time paediatric Surgeon at The Children’s Hospital Westmead.   She has a broad range of paediatric surgery clinical interests with a focus on colorectal conditions in childhood, paediatric burns, laparoscopic surgery and neonatal surgery.   She runs a long term follow up clinic for complex colorectal conditions in childhood and has a particular interest in anorectal malformations and Hirschsprung’s disease.  Torey undertook an observership in colorectal surgery at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Ohio, in 2012. She has a passion for teaching, education and research.  She teaches undergraduate and post graduate students and is a Supervisor of Surgical Training at The Children’s Hospital Westmead.

Medicinal cannabis for the treatment of pain, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease issues

Dr Teresa Towpic1

1Macquarie University Hospital, NSW

 


Biography:

Dr Towpik has been a General Practitioner in Australia since 1993 and an advocate of medicinal cannabis since the law was amended and cannabis was legalised for medicinal use. Since then she has been studying the therapeutic properties of cannabis, how it works in the human body and the potential applications in General Practice, especially in the management of chronic debilitating pain.

We are now experiencing a global cannabis phenomenon, it is widely accepted by the general public and there is a growing need for Doctors to be able to provide the necessary information to safety prescribe medicinal cannabis.

In 2016, Dr Towpik founded MediHuanna, an organisation that provides science-based medicinal cannabis education for Health Professionals. Dr Towpik sees cannabis as a therapeutic agent that has huge potential in General Practice. Her goal is to change the stigma behind cannabis through education, enabling it to be seen as an important medicine that should be integrated into modern medicine.

Surgical Innovation in colorectal surgery

Dr Kim Phan-Thien1

1Sydney’s St George Hospital, NSW


Biography:

Dr Kim Phan-Thien is a colorectal surgeon at Sydney’s St George Hospital. She graduated with honours in Medicine from the University of New South Wales, earned a Master of Surgery from the University of Sydney, is a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and a member of the Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand. Kim has a particular interest in minimally invasive (transanal, laparoscopic and robotic) techniques for the treatment of colorectal conditions. As an experienced robotic surgeon, she is a da Vinci accredited robotic proctor and helps with the training of surgeons in robotics.

Stomal closure and complications

Associate Professor Steve Smith1

1John Hunter Hospital, NSW

Defunctioning stomas are created in order to minimize complications associated with anastomotic colorectal surgery. The decision to create diverting stoma is a complex one and the science behind it is discussed in this talk along with the timing and methods of closure and ways to minimize complications associated with closure.


Biography:

Steve is a colorectal surgeon at the John Hunter Hospital and a conjoint associate professor at the University of Newcastle. He is the director of surgical training for the Hunter New England Network, the director of the surgical clinical research unit at the John Hunter, a councillor on the Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSSANZ) and on the foundation board of the CSSANZ.

He completed his PhD through the UoN in 2015 on the topic of ‘Enhancing Recovery after Colorectal Surgery’ and this followed on from a Masters of Surgery completed through Sydney University in 2005 on the topic of rectal prolapse. His primary field of research is in enhancing recovery for patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer and has been the principal investigator on over a dozen randomised clinical trials that have resulted in widespread change to clinical practice.

Essentially though he is a glorified plumber who is made to look good (sort of) by the stomal therapists who work with him.

Anaesthetic options in colorectal cancer surgery

Associate Professor Steve Smith1

1John Hunter Hospital, NSW

There is emerging science to suggest that the modality of anaesthesia used for colorectal surgery may play a part in not only the short term recovery following surgery but also longer term cancer outcomes. This talk will delve into newer modalities of anaesthetic delivery, both intra and post-operatively.


Biography:

Steve is a colorectal surgeon at the John Hunter Hospital and a conjoint associate professor at the University of Newcastle. He is the director of surgical training for the Hunter New England Network, the director of the surgical clinical research unit at the John Hunter, a councillor on the Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSSANZ) and on the foundation board of the CSSANZ.

He completed his PhD through the UoN in 2015 on the topic of ‘Enhancing Recovery after Colorectal Surgery’ and this followed on from a Masters of Surgery completed through Sydney University in 2005 on the topic of rectal prolapse. His primary field of research is in enhancing recovery for patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer and has been the principal investigator on over a dozen randomised clinical trials that have resulted in widespread change to clinical practice.

Essentially though he is a glorified plumber who is made to look good (sort of) by the stomal therapists who work with him.

Why stomal therapy nurses need to broaden their scope of practice for the sake of improved patient quality of life

Dr Vicky Patton

As new treatments develop stomaltherapy nurses are in an ideal position to assist patients with  bowel management methods even though they may be considered in the realm of continence. Stomaltherapy nurses understand bowel function, medications that alter bowel function and have the skills to counsel patients. This paper will examine the evidence behind sacral nerve stimulation, anterior resection syndrome, antegrade and retrograde colonic enemas and identify why our expert knowledge is pivotal in maintaining these patient’s quality of life.


Biography

Vicki has a background in stoma wound and continence nursing and has a particular interest in pelvic floor dysfunction. She completed her masters in research on management of antegrade colonic enemas via caecostomy in 2009 and then worked as a Clinical Nurse Consultant in a pelvic floor unit in Sydney for many years where she developed her skills in anorectal physiology and biofeedback. Vicki has worked within a multi-disciplinary team which focussed on disorders of defaecation including constipation, faecal incontinence, obstructed emptying and low anterior resection syndrome.

Vicki was awarded her PhD in early 2018 which examined the cost, treatment efficacy and the role of colonic dysmotility in faecal incontinence and constipation. She is currently undertaking a three year clinical research fellowship jointly funded by Edith Cowan University and Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, WA.

Pressure injuries: Voyage to infinity and beyond!

Pressure injuries have plagued us as a society for hundreds of years. Despite major developments in risk assessment and management of pressure injuries these continue to be recognised in the top three causes of preventable harm globally. A review of literature indicates that pressure injuries are 95% preventable, however what about specialised groups such as oncology?

Whilst contributing to a significant imposition on health care resources (increased length of stay, infection, reduced mobility, back injuries to staff) the cost to the patient in terms of quality of life, pain and suffering and impact on the family cannot be understated.

It is now time to rethink how we can move from crisis management to preventative management for pressure injury avoidance.

The questions we need to ask are:

  1. How are we damaging skin?
  2. Is our practice based on ritualistic generational learnt habits rather than evidence based practice?
  3. What little things can we change to make a big difference?

Pressure injuries can occur in any healthcare setting. To achieve effective preventative care, it requires a multi-disciplinary team. More so, every healthcare member needs to ensure they understand their role in providing quality pressure injury preventative management.

This presentation will challenge health care workers to understand the priority of this nurse sensitive indicator. It will assist clinicians to identify patients at risk of pressure injuries and outline specific interventions for prevention.


Biography:

Tracy is currently employed within a major metropolitan hospital in Brisbane as Clinical Nurse Consultant to manage the central equipment service.  A significant focus of her role within this department has been to bring innovation in the development of a central equipment service to ensure optimal patient outcomes through safe, equitable equipment management, education and maintenance. This service also specialises in pressure injury prevention, management of the Bariatric patient, Falls prevention, bed safety, Smart Pump Technology, skin integrity and risk management. Tracy is lead role in Queensland Bariatric Interest Group (QBIG). She has been on the development team for the Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Guidelines and is on the Review committee for the International Pressure Injury Guidelines. Tracy is a member of the Australian Pressure Injury Alliance Panel (APIAP) and the National Standards review committee.

Tracy has extensive experience in presenting innovative approaches to quality risk management topics both nationally and internationally.

A focus of her teaching is to ensure people have fun in learning.

AASTN

This conference is proudly hosted by the Australian Association of Stomal Therapy Nurses: www.stomaltherapy.com

One of the Association's major objectives is the promotion of quality care for a wide range of people with specific needs. These needs may be related to ostomy construction, urinary or faecal incontinence, wounds with or without tube insertion and breast surgery.

Patients/clients across the life span are provided with preventative, acute, rehabilitative and continuing care as required. Another objective is the maintenance and improvement of professional standards in relation to Stomal Therapy Nursing Practice to the highest degree possible. Recognition of the need for and encouragement of the development of specialist expertise in the field of Stomal Therapy Nursing underpins the Standards for Stomal Therapy Nursing Practice.

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